Undergraduate Fellowships

Click on the title of a fellowship to read a short description, which includes application deadlines, contact information for the Whittier advisors who mentor students for each fellowship, and a link to the sponsoring foundation’s website for further information.

 

With the support of the Ahmanson Family Foundation, Whittier College has established the Ahmanson Veterans Fellowships which is dedicated to increasing the opportunity for up to three sophomore, junior, or senior United States military veterans with a minimum GPA of 3.0 to engage in a substantial undergraduate research project with a faculty mentor for a semester, an academic year, or a summer term. Each fellow will receive a $1,750 stipend per semester or $3,500 for summer research, in order to pursue a research question that will continue through the year and inform a scholarly presentation, perhaps but not necessarily only in support of a senior project presentation. The application process includes an 800-word personal statement, a 1000-word project proposal (with timeline, budget, and methodology), faculty mentor recommendation, and an interview. Applications should be submitted to the advisor by the deadline (see below) and will be evaluated by the advisor and a faculty committee on the basis of intellectual rigor, likelihood of success, and how the project fits with the students’ future academic and career goals.
Advisor: TBA
Application: TBA

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With the generous support of Don ’50 and Virginia Baudrand, Whittier College has established the Don ’50 and Virginia Baudrand Fellowship, dedicated to providing financial and mentoring support to Whittier’s best students interested in conducting chemistry research with a faculty member.  This fellowship provides funds for students in their sophomore, junior, or senior year to enter into a supervised research project and earn an augmenting scholarship for the fall term following the completion of the summer research project.  Each fellow will receive a summer stipend of approximately $1,750 for summer research, a budget of approximately $250 for research related materials, and approximately $250 in a scholarship for the fall term following the completion of the summer research project.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better and be interested in the field of Chemistry.  Applications include a 500 word essay outlining your research areas of interest while expanding upon how a research fellowship will fit with your future plans; selected applicants will interview with the advisor.
Advisor: Devin Iimoto, Chemistry
Application:  TBA

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Boren Scholarships provide grants ($20,000 for a full academic year, $10,000 per semester, $8,000 for summer (8+ weeks)) to U.S. citizen undergraduate students studying languages and cultures in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests yet are underrepresented in study abroad. Areas include Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East (and exclude Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand). Boren Scholarships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Competitive applicants should identify how their study abroad program, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security. Goals may include not only traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, e.g. sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. In exchange for financial support, Boren Scholars incur a service obligation in the U.S. government in a position with national security responsibilities.
Advisor: Katie Roller, Director of International Programs
Application: due in mid-February; check with the advisor for earlier on-campus deadlines

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City of Hope's Eugene and Ruth Roberts Summer Student Academy gives curious and hardworking students the opportunity to learn about science. City of Hope’s summer program students select their own research project according to their individual areas of interest. Selected participants then spend 10 weeks working full-time as a member of a biomedical research team. During the program, students will attend seminars, poster sessions, and meetings with faculty. Students are also presented with the opportunity to present at the Southern California Conference for Undergraduate Research. Students in the program are awarded a $4,000 dollar stipend for their research and work. Candidates must submit an online application, and any additional information such as transcripts, letters of recommendation, and resumes are advisable but not required. These may be submitted online with your application. 
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in mid-March

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The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) provides fully-funded group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences for seven to ten weeks for U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a U.S. degree-granting program at the undergraduate or graduate level. Current undergraduate students must have completed at least one year of general college course-work by the program start date (one year is defined as two semesters or three quarters). All CLS Program costs are covered for participants including: travel to and from the student's U.S. home city and program location, a mandatory Washington, D.C. pre-departure orientation, applicable visa fees, room, board, group-based intensive language instruction, program-sponsored travel within the country, and all entrance fees for CLS Program cultural enhancement activities. Please note that U.S. passport fees will not be paid by the scholarship, and you will be required to cover transportation to and from your U.S. home address and the airport for CLS Program travel. Applications include an online application, unofficial transcripts, two letters of reference, two short-answer questions (about your interest in language study and your plans to continue that study after the program concludes), and two short essays (about the connection between language study and your academic/career goals and your ability to deal with challenging living situations).
Advisor: Shari Henderson, Assistant Director of International Programs
Application: due in mid-November

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The DAAD Undergraduate Scholarship focuses on outstanding undergraduate students who will be juniors or seniors during their fellowship year and who are seeking financial support for study abroad in any academic field in German universities or for an internship in Germany. Funding includes a monthly stipend, travel and research expenses, and health insurance. German language competency is not required, but candidates must submit a language evaluation form with the application. DAAD scholarships fund a minimum of four months (one semester) to a maximum of ten months (one academic year); the scholarship period must take place within the German academic year between October and July. Candidates must have well-defined study or internship plans which demonstrate an interest in contemporary German and European affairs and explain the significance of their project in Germany to their future studies or to their research/professional goals. Applications include an online application form, resume, project proposal, two letters of recommendation, transcripts, and letter of acceptance into a study abroad or exchange program. Also, note that a hard copy of the online application is required with the applicant’s signature, along with three additional copies, to be mailed to the DAAD NY office.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in late January

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The Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace at Middlebury College address today’s critical need for increased language proficiency in the United States. Candidates should have demonstrated an interest in international, global, or area studies; international politics and economics; or, peace and security studies.  Individuals in other fields are encouraged to apply if their field requires the study of one of the critical languages above. This competitive merit-based fellowship covers tuition, room, and board for one summer language study program from beginner to graduate levels in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Portuguese and Russian at the Middlebury College Language Schools. Previous language experience recommended. Applicants must include a complete application to an eligible language school, and two copies of the following: coversheet, Davis Fellow essay, and résumé.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due early January

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The Mary Davis Fellowship in Public Service will be awarded to two students annually ($7,000 per student per year) who are pursuing internships or field research related to economic development and the general improvement of the human condition. Each fellow will receive a $4,000 stipend for their internship/research, a $2,000 scholarship upon completing their internship/research, and $1000 for supplies or travel funds. There is an additional $500 stipend for a faculty mentor to work with each fellow for a total of $1000 if the same faculty member mentors both fellows. This fellowship is particularly directed at women from any major who have a firm career interest in public service and who will do their internships or field research projects in the US or abroad (except China). The first fellows will be selected during this academic year, 2013-2014, and thereafter for two more years (for three years total). Application process is TBA.
Advisor: Mike McBride, Political Science
Application: TBA

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Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants up to $5,000 for U.S. citizen undergraduate students with limited financial means to pursue academic studies in especially non-traditional study abroad destinations outside of Western Europe and Australia. Gilman aims to support students who currently receive Federal Pell Grants and who have been traditionally underrepresented in study abroad. Candidates may include but are not limited to: students with high financial need, community college students, first-generation college students, students in under-represented fields such as the sciences and engineering, students from diverse ethnic backgrounds, or students with disabilities. Such international study is intended to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in an increasingly global economy and interdependent world. Award recipients are chosen by a competitive selection process and must use the award to defray eligible study abroad costs.
Advisor: Katie Roller, Director of International Programs
Application: due in early March for summer, fall, and academic year programs and in early October for spring programs

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The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was authorized by the United States Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S. Senate. This scholarship is awarded to sophomores or juniors (i.e., rising juniors and seniors) majoring in math, the natural sciences, or engineering. Candidates must have at least a 3.0 GPA, stand in the top 25% of their class, and plan to pursue graduate study toward a Ph.D. and a career in teaching and research. Nominated by the faculty advisor, applicants for the Goldwater Scholarships must include a statement of career interests in the online application, detailing how their academic program and their overall educational plans will prepare them for their chosen goals. About 300 awards are granted each year, with each award providing up to $7,500 per year toward undergraduate tuition, fees, books, and room and board.
Advisor: TBA
Application: due in January; check with the advisor about earlier on-campus deadlines

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The Pamela Harriman Foreign Service Fellowships provide an opportunity for sophomores, juniors, or seniors interested in foreign service to intern during the summer at one of three locations: the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C. or the U.S. Embassy in London or Paris. The Harriman award is nationally competitive and highly selective, offering a $5,000 stipend for travel and living expenses to three outstanding undergraduates each year. Applicants must be U.S. citizens with an excellent academic record who demonstrate leadership, public service and community work, and research or creative projects. In addition to an application form, transcripts, and a statement of interest, candidates must also provide two detailed recommendations from faculty members. Students must first apply for a summer internship with the State Department. The State Department will forward the list of qualifying candidates to the Harriman Selection Board. Interns are notified in February; eligible candidates for the Harriman are also notified in February and requested to submit supplemental materials. Interviews with finalists and selection of Harriman Fellows take place in March and April.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in mid October

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The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has provided Whittier College with funds to help increase the number of science and math majors who pursue careers in math and science education, including K-12 education. In order to accomplish this, Whittier College has established the HHMI-SMART (Science and Math in Research and Teaching) Program. Whittier sophomore and junior science and math majors with a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA will be selected to participate in a program that will allow them to: 1) complete a substantial research project in their field, under faculty supervision; 2) participate in two-week summer workshops with local high school math and science teachers to explore new ways of bringing research experiences to the high school curriculum; and 3) help local high school teachers during the academic year to put new activities into place in their classrooms. Up to 10 Whittier College students will be selected as SMART Fellows, to officially begin in the summer of 2013. Each SMART Fellow will receive, for the two years of the fellowship, summer research stipends ($4,500); academic year stipends ($1250 per semester); research project funds ($400); and conference travel funds ($800). Applicants will be selected based on the following criteria: likelihood of academic success, of success in individual research, and of pursuing a teaching career. Contact the fellowship advisor for application materials; interviews for finalists will take place in mid-March.
Advisor: David Bourgaize, Biology and Director, Center for Science, Health, and Policy
Application: TBA

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The Language Schools Scholarships are offered by the Middlebury College Languages Schools for language students in their summer program from historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic serving institutions, or Tribal colleges. Applicants for this scholarship should strongly demonstrate an interest or previous experience in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian or Spanish. Recipients of these scholarships will receive funding to cover the tuition and room/board for their summer language program at Middlebury College Language Schools. Applications include a complete online application to an eligible language school; three copies of the cover sheet; three copies of the short essay; and, a letter of support from a Dean, faculty member, or program director indicating support from your home institution. 
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies, Director of Graduate Fellowships
Application: due in mid-January

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With the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Whittier College has established the Mellon-Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program, which is designed to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups who will pursue a Ph.D. and enter the professoriate in core arts-and-sciences fields. The MMUF Program aims to equalize the ethnic and racial composition of faculties in higher education and also to address the attendant educational consequences of these disparities. In addition to an application form and an unofficial transcript demonstrating a minimum 3.0 GPA, applications include two essays (800 word personal essay, 500 word MMUF essay), one graded paper as a writing sample, and two letters of recommendation (from your prospective MMUF faculty mentor and from a faculty member outside your major). After careful reviews and interviews by the advisory committee, five Whittier College sophomore and junior students will be selected annually as Mellon Mays Fellows. Each fellow will receive tuition assistance, summer research funds, and academic-year support from Whittier faculty mentors and from other Fellows at Mellon Mays-sponsored events.
Advisor: Sylvia A. Vetrone, Biology; Shannon Stanton, Education and Child Development
Application: due in late-October; project synopsis due in early November; interviews and final selection in mid-November

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The National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Undergraduate Fellows Program introduces undergraduates to the field of student affairs in higher education. Undergraduates must identify a mentor who is also a NASPA member. The mentor and fellow apply together and, if selected, create a semi-structured mentoring program at Whittier. In addition to developing research and presentation skills, networking skills, and personal awareness, fellows are also given the opportunity to attend a national conference, participate in paid internships, and participate in the Summer Leadership Institute. Candidates for this fellowship should have a NASPA member at Whittier agree to serve as a mentor, have the support of Whittier’s senior student affairs officer, identify as a member of a historically disenfranchised or underrepresented student population in higher education (including but not limited to those of racial and ethnic-minority background; those having a disability; and those identifying as LGBTQ), and have at least a 2.7 cumulative GPA at the time of application.
Advisor: TBA
Application: due in early Fall and early May

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The National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The scholarship will pay up to $20,000 in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years. After each year of scholarship support, scholars will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. During the summer, each scholar will be assigned to an NIH researcher and an NIH postdoctoral fellow who will serve as mentors. Applicants must be U.S. citizens (or permanent residents) and full-time college juniors or seniors with a minimum 3.3 cumulative GPA. Candidates must also demonstrate ‘exceptional financial need’ or certify that they come from a disadvantaged background. Upon graduation, NIH Scholars must serve one year of full-time employment with NIH for each year of scholarship support.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early March

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The National Network for Environmental Management Studies (NNEMS) provides associate, undergraduate, and graduate students with practical research opportunities and experiences in an EPA office or laboratory, increases public awareness of and involvement in environmental issues, encourages qualified individuals to pursue environmental careers, and helps defray the costs associated with the pursuit of academic programs related to the field of environmental protection, such as pollution control, science, engineering, technology, social science, and specialty areas. Each year, the NNEMS program offers fellowships developed and sponsored by the EPA Headquarters office in Washington, D.C. and in the EPA’s 10 regional offices and laboratories throughout the United States. The projects are specifically narrow in scope, allowing students to complete the fellowship while working full-time at the EPA during the summer or part-time during the school year. Fellows receive a stipend based on the student's level of education and the duration and location of the project. Candidates must be US citizens or permanent residents and enrolled at an accredited academic institution.  Undergraduates must have a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least four courses related to the field of environmental studies.  Graduate students must be currently enrolled in a graduate or Ph.D. program or provide proof of acceptance and enrollment in a graduate or Ph.D. program at the time of the fellowship award.  Applications include an online form; short answers to three questions regarding your proposed research plan, prior academic/professional/relevant experience, and academic goals; an application for federal assistance; a resume; official transcripts; one reference from a professor or advisor; and, a disclosure and waiver statement required by the program
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early February

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Created by gifts of friends and alumni/ae of Whittier College to honor alumnus and former U.S. President Richard M. Nixon '34, Whittier College established the Nixon Fellowship Program to promote civic responsibility, develop leadership potential, advance informed public policy analysis, and encourage public service among promising first-year, sophomore, and junior Whittier students. The Nixon Fellowship is designed for a selected student to pursue a year-long research project on an aspect of the Nixon administration that relates to the student's academic/career interests. In addition to an application form, transcript, and résumé, applicants must have a minimum 3.2 cumulative GPA and propose a year-long project (including a summer or academic year internship) that features research, study (both on or off-campus), travel, and/or professional development. A faculty committee will review all applications based on academic criteria and on the nature/focus of the proposal. Ordinarily, one Fellow will be selected to receive a $5,000 stipend to support that proposal.
Advisor: Mike McBride, Political Science
Application: TBA

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Established through a gift from James R. Parks, Whittier College Board of Trustee member, The Parks Prizes and Fellowship are open to first and second year Whittier students in good academic and social standing who have declared or intend to declare a major in Business Administration. $1,000 Parks Prizes will be awarded to students whom the faculty members in Business Administration identify as exhibiting “a substantial spark” revealing outstanding potential as a leader in the business community upon graduation. Students must demonstrate drive, energy, and motivation. Some recipients may be eligible for an extra financial award to be applied toward the student’s tuition. The Parks Fellowship will be awarded to one student whom the faculty members in the Department of Business Administration identify as exhibiting “a substantial spark” revealing outstanding potential as a leader in the business community upon graduation. Applicants must demonstrate drive, energy, and motivation. The Fellowship carries an award of $7,000, with a $3,500 stipend to enable the Fellow to take on an unpaid or low-paid internship and the remaining $3,500 to be applied toward the student’s tuition. Applications include a form; a personal statement telling us about yourself and explaining why you have declared (or intend to declare) Business Administration as your major, what your future professional goals are, and how you will benefit from the Parks Prize (or from the internship facilitated by the Parks Fellowship); and an unofficial academic transcript. A committee of Business Administration faculty will review all application materials and select the recipients.
Advisor: Jeffrey N. Decker, Business Administration
Application: TBA

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With the generous support of Ed Petersen ’93, Whittier College has established the Ed Petersen ’93 Fellowship, dedicated to providing financial and mentoring support to one of Whittier’s best students pursuing a minor in Organizational Leadership.  This fellowship provides one student with a $3,500 stipend in the summer following his/her sophomore or junior year to pursue a low-paid or unpaid internship, and a $1,000 scholarship for the fall semester upon the completion of the internship. The fellow will also be required to engage in reflective practice on the internship with a faculty mentor, ordinarily by enrolling in INTD 299 Internship or a similar approved course. Applications include a letter of application, a graded assignment from a specified course in the minor, and an interview. 
Advisor: Susan Gotsch, Sociology
Application: TBA

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The Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship is funded by the United States Department of State and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, with the goal to attract U.S. citizen juniors with a minimum 3.2 cumulative GPA in academic programs relevant to international affairs, political and economic analysis, administration, management, and science policy who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in international studies at one of the graduate schools participating in the program and in a future career as a Foreign Service Officer. The fellowship award includes funding up to $40,000 during the senior year of college and the first year of graduate study. Application materials include an online application, certification of U.S. citizenship, official transcripts, SAT/ACT scores, copies of the most recent financial aid letter and SAR, and two letters of recommendation. Criteria for selection are based on applicants' outstanding leadership skills and academic achievement in relevant academic programs, such as international affairs, management, communications, history, political science, economics, and foreign languages. Finalists will be invited to an interview in Washington, D.C. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.
Advisor: Katie Roller; Director of International Programs; Fred Bergerson, Political Science
Application: due in early February

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The Point Foundation Scholarships aim to provide educational opportunities for LGBTQ students who have cultivated a strong academic and leadership record and who have significant financial need. The scholarship provides support for tuition, room and board, and other related expenses; the average amount awarded each scholar is $13,600. Candidates submit an online application with short essays regarding educational and professional goals, financial situation, and experiences with both marginalization and positive change. Semi-finalists will be required to submit supplemental application materials. If selected, Point Scholars are expected to maintain a 3.3 GPA, attend Point’s leadership programs currently held twice each year, and complete a community service project that benefits the LGBTQ community.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: Part I due in late January, Part II due in mid March

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The Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship prepares juniors (who will be rising seniors) from diverse backgrounds and perspectives for graduate studies in public service and/or international affairs. All academic majors are welcome to apply. The award includes full tuition to attend the Junior Summer Institute, a minimum $1,000 stipend, and a minimum $5,000 grant toward graduate school tuition. Prior to attending JSI, students must have already completed their junior year and have at least one semester of coursework left to be completed. Candidates for this fellowship must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents with transcripts and applications that demonstrate an ability to succeed in a master’s program in public service and/or international affairs at one of the PPIA consortium graduate schools. Applications include an online application form, personal statement, resume, transcripts, financial aid information, and two letters of recommendation.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early November

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The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program offers a six-week summer program designed to provide 15-20 undergraduates - Rangel Scholars - with the opportunity to enhance their skills, knowledge, and understanding about U.S. foreign policy. Rangel Scholars live at Howard University, attend classes in U.S. foreign relations, political economy, and writing, and participate in a variety of programs with foreign affairs professionals at Howard and at diverse locations around Washington, D.C. The program covers tuition, travel, and room and board, as well as provides a stipend. Applicants must be U.S. citizens, a full-time undergraduate student, and have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher. Application materials include an online application form, a 500 word interest statement that explains your interest in international affairs and how this program will assist you in pursuing this interest, transcripts from all colleges attended, three letters of recommendation, and proof of U.S. citizenship. A panel of individuals with experience in foreign affairs and academia evaluates candidates' applications. The program will strive to complete the selection process and make offers by the end of March.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early February

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With the generous support of alumna Janet Roberts ’64, Whittier College has established the Janet L. Roberts M.D. ’64 Fellowship, dedicated to providing financial and mentoring support to Whittier’s best students interested in conducting biology research with a faculty member.  This fellowship provides funds for students in their sophomore, junior, or senior year to enter into a supervised research project and earn an augmenting scholarship for the fall term following the completion of the summer research project.  Each fellow will receive a summer stipend of $3,000 for summer research, a budget of $500 for research related materials, and $1,000 in an augmenting scholarship in the fall following the completion of their work.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better and be interested in the field of Biology, with a preference for students interested in attending medical school.  Applications include a 500 word essay outlining your research areas of interest while expanding upon how a research fellowship will fit with your future plans; selected applicants will interview with the advisor.
Advisor: Dave Bourgaize, Biology and Director, Center for Science, Health, and Policy
Application: TBA

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The SMART Scholarship for Service Program is an opportunity for students pursuing a degree in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines to receive a full scholarship and be gainfully employed with the US Department of Defense upon graduation. The program is particularly interested in supporting students who demonstrate an aptitude and interest in conducting theoretical and applied research. Applicants should be interested in working as a civilian research scientist or engineer. Benefits include full tuition and related fees; a stipend paid at a rate depending on degree and on award length; paid summer internships; and health Insurance and books allowance. Applicants must be U.S. citizens, able to participate in summer internships at DoD laboratories, willing to accept post-graduate employment with the DoD, in good standing with a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA, and, pursuing an undergraduate degree in one of the disciplines stipulated by the SMART Program. Application materials include an online application, a resume, a statement (limited to 5000 characters) of current and longterm educational goals, a statement (limited to 5000 characters) of research interests explaining the factors and experiences that led you to choose your field of study and specific challenges or problems in your field that most interest you and why, transcripts, SAT/ACT scores, and three references.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in mid-December

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The Travelers Summer Research Fellowship Program is designed to give 25 pre-medical school students deeper insights into the field of medicine, including issues that greatly affect the health of traditionally underserved groups. During the summer at Cornell Medical College, the program enables fellows to conduct laboratory and clinical research under the supervision of a faculty member and to attend lectures addressing the health care concerns of minority communities.  Rounds in the hospital with advanced students provide further exposure to the clinical facets of medicine. Fellows also receive counseling on financial planning for medical school.  Housing and travel expenses are covered for students that live some distance from New York, in addition to a $140-a-week cost-of-living allowance. Fellows pay for their meals and other living expenses.  All pre-med juniors and seniors with a cumulative 3.0 GPA from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Applications include a transcript, two letters of recommendation, and an essay outlining your interest in the medical field and working with underserved populations.  
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early February

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The Truman Scholarship is a $30,000 merit-based grant awarded to about 60 to 65 outstanding juniors annually who wish financial support to attend graduate or professional school in preparation for careers in government, the non-profit sector, or elsewhere in public service at a leadership level. Truman Scholars are invited to participate in a number of programs, such as the Truman Scholars Leadership Week, Summer Institute, and Fellows Program. Applications consist of an in-depth application form, transcripts (indicating a cumulative GPA in the top 25% of the class), a policy proposal, an institutional nomination form and letter from the fellowship advisor, and three additional letters of recommendation. Truman Scholars commit to work in public service for three of the first seven years after completing a graduate degree.
Advisor: Fred Bergerson, Political Science
Application: due in early February; check with the advisor for earlier on-campus deadlines

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Established by the U.S. Congress in 1992, the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation honors Congressman Morris King Udall's thirty-year legacy of public service and Stewart L. Udall's vast public service by awarding up to $5,000 to sophomores and juniors who are committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy, or Native American health care. Students are nominated by the fellowship advisor, and submit an application accompanied by an 800-word essay, official college transcripts from all colleges attended which indicate a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA, and three letters of recommendation.
Advisor: sal johnston, Sociology; Cheryl Swift, Biology
Application: due in early March; check with the advisor about earlier on-campus deadlines

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UNCF/MERCK Undergraduate Science Research Scholarship Awards target African American juniors who are enrolled in a four-year U.S. college or university and who are majoring in biological or chemical sciences or engineering. Each award provides up to $25,000 towards tuition, room and board, and billable fees. In addition, each UNCF/Merck Undergraduate Fellow will be mentored by a Merck scientist and will receive a Summer Research Internship with a stipend of at least $5,000. Internships will take place at a Merck facility the summer following junior year and the summer following graduation. Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, maintain at least a 3.3 cumulative GPA, and be prepared to commit to summer internships. A UNCF/Merck selection committee consisting of Merck scientists and engineers will evaluate the applicants based on GPA, demonstrated interest in a scientific education and a career in scientific research or engineering, and ability to perform in a laboratory environment.
Advisor: Rosemary P. Carbine, Religious Studies and Director of Fellowships
Application: due in early November

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US-UK Fulbright Commission Summer Institutes offer the opportunity for US citizen freshmen and sophomore undergraduate students with a minimum cumulative 3.5 GPA to attend a three-six week summer program at a world-class UK university or cultural institution.  Each of the nine different institutes provide an immersive academic, cultural and social experience for American students who wish to deepen their knowledge of the United Kingdom and its diverse populations while developing their communication, research, and presentation skills.  Most costs are covered by the program, including travel, tuition and fees, housing and meals, and cultural visits.  Applications include a standard application form, a personal statement, an essay on a designated topic, an official transcript, and two letters of recommendation. Selected applicants will be interviewed by the US-UK Fulbright committee and will be notified within a week after the interview about the status of their applications.
Advisor: Shari Henderson, Office of International Programs
Application: due in mid-March

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With the generous support of the Yao Yuan Sze Foundation, Whittier College has established the Yao Yuan Sze Fellowship, dedicated to providing financial and mentoring support to two of Whittier’s best students interested in conducting kinesiology research with a faculty member.  This fellowship provides funds for students in their sophomore, junior, or senior year to enter into a supervised research project and earn an augmenting scholarship for the fall term following the completion of the summer research project.  Each fellow will receive a summer stipend of $3,000 for summer research, a budget of $500 for research related materials, and $1,000 in an augmenting scholarship in the fall following the completion of their work.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better and be interested in the field of Kinesiology.  Applications include a 500 word essay outlining your research areas of interest while expanding upon how a research fellowship will fit with your future plans; selected applicants will interview with the advisor.  
Advisor: Trish Van Oosbree, Kinesiology
Application:  TBA

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